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CFAS News Previous Edition


Synagogue Shooting Response; New Leadership for Rush, UT Southwestern; Learn Serve Lead: AAMC Annual Meeting Kicks Off; and Other Items of Interest

The Washington Post covered the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center's (UPMC) Presbyterian trauma center response after the mass shooting at Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, quoting Donald Yealy, MD, chair of emergency medicine and professor of medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Dr. Yealy is the senior CFAS rep for the School of Medicine and a former president of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, a CFAS-member society.
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Another Washington Post article described the "humanity" in a Jewish physician's impartial care of the accused shooter, Robert Bowers. "I thought it was important to at least talk to him and meet him. You can't on one hand say we should talk to each other, and then I don't talk to him. So you lead by example, and I'm the leader of the hospital," said Jeffrey K. Cohen, MD, president of Allegheny General Hospital.
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Sherine Gabriel, MD, has been named president of Rush University. Dr. Gabriel has served as dean of Robert Wood Johnson Medical School at Rutgers University since 2015.
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W.P. Andrew Lee, MD, has been appointed executive vice president for academic affairs, provost, and dean of the UT Southwestern Medical School, effective Feb. 4. Dr. Lee serves as chair of the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
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Learn Serve Lead 2018: The AAMC Annual Meeting kicks off today and runs through Tuesday, Nov. 6, in Austin, Texas. Among the speakers is Lindsey Fitzharris, PhD, author of The Butchering Art: Joseph Lister's Quest to Transform the Grisly World of Victorian Medicine. An author profile of Dr. Fitzharris, a medical historian, appears in AAMCNews.
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"The AAMC is extremely disappointed that CMS exceeded its regulatory authority and ignored feedback from a bipartisan group of nearly 200 members of Congress and stakeholder opposition by finalizing the expansion of flawed site-neutral payment policies. This is a reduction of 60% in Medicare reimbursements to excepted off-campus provider-based departments," said AAMC President and CEO Darrell G. Kirch, MD, in a statement on the 2019 Medicare Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Payment Systems (OPPS) final rule released today by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.
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UNC Health Care CEO William Roper, MD, MPH, was named interim president of the UNC system on Thursday, reported the News & Observer of Raleigh, North Carolina. Dr. Roper will succeed Margaret Spellings, who will step down at the end of the year. Earlier this year, Dr. Roper stepped down as dean of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine and CEO of UNC Health Care.
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The AAMC has released a statement on the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule, Quality Payment Program final rule, which was released Thursday by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). "The AAMC is pleased with the documentation changes finalized by CMS in today's rule. These will significantly reduce burden for physicians and other health care professionals, allowing them more time to focus on patients," said Darrell G. Kirch, MD, AAMC president and CEO.
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The AAMC published a report, Reshaping the Journey: American Indians and Alaska Natives in Medicine, which delves into the state of American Indian and Alaska Native representation in medicine and summarizes practices and programs that have contributed to the development of Native physicians.
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Gerald Hill, MD, one of the report's authors, chairman of the Klamath Tribes Health Advisory Committee, and a member and past president of the Association of American Indian Physicians (AAIP), wrote an opinion piece in AAMCNews commenting on the report's findings.
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HHS issued a proposed rule-making suggesting the long-delayed ceiling prices for the 340B drug program will go into effect Jan. 1 instead of July 1, 2019, reported Modern Healthcare.
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Walid F. Gellad, MD, an associate professor of medicine and director of the Center for Pharmaceutical Policy and Prescribing at the University of Pittsburgh, wrote an opinion piece in STAT on the obstacles facing the Trump administration's proposals to reform Medicare Part B drug prices.
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The CDC's advisers on acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) are "frustrated and disappointed" with the agency's response to the rare, polio-like disease that has afflicted hundreds of kids over the past six years, said CNN.
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The NIH is pausing human testing of an experimental stem cell therapy for heart failure as questions mount over the validity of the work of Piero Anversa, MD, a former Harvard investigator whose work formed the foundation of the trial, reported the Washington Post.
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Fatima Cody Stanford, MD, MPH, a Massachusetts General Hospital physician and obesity expert who provided medical care to a fellow passenger in distress aboard a flight, believes she was racially profiled by the crew when they repeatedly questioned her credentials, reports the Boston Globe. MGH issued a statement in her support.
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A Research Letter in JAMA Internal Medicine examined the prevalence of conflicts of interest in clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) and said there is probably a high prevalence of undeclared industry payments to authors of CPGs related to high-revenue medications.
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Jeffrey Botkin, MD, MPH, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Utah School of Medicine, wrote a Viewpoint in JAMA that explored the question of whether failure to disclose significant financial conflicts of interest should be considered research misconduct.
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Inside Higher Ed covered a study in PLOS One that questioned whether doctoral admissions for STEM programs should use the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
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Inside Higher Ed also pondered how the lawsuit against Harvard University's admissions policies could change how universities consider race in their admissions policies.
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"After a 20-year rollercoaster and billions in investments by major pharmaceutical companies and numerous start-ups, the first RNAi therapy won [FDA] approval in August," reported a perspective in JAMA that described how RNA interference (RNAi) is finally being harnessed to produce genetic therapies.
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Inside Higher Ed ran an article, "Harassment at the Annual Meeting," which focused on a summary of a report by the American Historical Association that investigated ways attendees felt mistreated at their annual event. Among the findings, nearly 28% of those surveyed felt "put down or condescended to" at least once, and 10% reported experiencing behavior of other attendees, including leering or staring, that made them uncomfortable.
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Medical and nursing schools are struggling to retool their curricula as new technologies, such as 3D printing, explode into patient care and change the health care delivery system almost daily, reported the New York Times.
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"Despite laws that require ramps and wider doors for access, many medical offices don't have scales that can accommodate wheelchairs, or adjustable exam tables for patients who cannot get up on one," said the Washington Post in an article that detailed the difficulties disabled people face during visits to their doctors' offices.
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Rich Joseph, MD, an internal medicine resident at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, contributed a piece to STAT on the troubling demand he and his colleagues hear to just "be more resilient" when faced with a difficult situation. "Rather than viewing these stresses as sources of burnout, a more productive approach would be to reframe them as opportunities to develop more self-awareness, better emotional regulation, healthier routines, and restorative practices," he writes.
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CNBC explained why peanut reactions and peanut allergies in kids tripled from 1997 to 2008 and are now being described by some doctors as "almost epidemic."
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About 75,000 children and teens in the United States wound up in emergency rooms due to gun violence over nine years, reported the AP in its coverage of the first nationally representative study on ER visits for gun injuries among American kids.
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"If you happen to have had a gynecological surgery at a major teaching hospital in the U.S., there's a good chance that after you were given the anesthetic, several medical students used your unresponsive body to learn how to perform a proper pelvic exam," reported Slate in an article about evolving understanding of consent in medical training.
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Austin Frakt, PhD, director of the Partnered Evidence-Based Policy Resource Center at the VA Boston Healthcare System and an associate professor at Boston University School of Public Health, wrote an article in the New York Times on the worsening trend of rural hospital closures.
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Abrazo Community Health Network is launching general surgery and internal medicine residencies. There will be 45 positions for internal medicine and 15 for general surgery. Applications are now being accepted for rotations starting in July 2019.
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The AAMC is hosting a webinar, NIH HEAL Initiative: Program Update and Funding Opportunities for Pain Research Available through NIH, on Thursday, Nov. 8 at 3 p.m. EST.
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Richard Legro, MD, has been named chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and Penn State College of Medicine. Dr. Legro served as interim chair since July of last year.
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Matthew Weissman, MD, MBA, has been named chair of the Department of Medicine at Mount Sinai Beth Israel and senior faculty in internal medicine and pediatrics at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Dr. Weissman previously served as chief medical officer of Community Healthcare Network in New York City.
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Steven Lipshultz, MD, has been named the A. Conger Goodyear Professor and Chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo. Dr. Lipshultz is the Carman and Ann Adams Endowed Chair of Pediatric Research at Wayne State University School of Medicine and Children's Hospital of Michigan.
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Evalina Burger, MD, has been named chair of the Department of Orthopedics at the University of Colorado (CU) School of Medicine. Dr. Burger has been a faculty member at the CU School of Medicine since 2006.
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Wendy Streitz has been appointed president of the Council on Government Relations (COGR). Streitz previously served as executive director of Research Policy Analysis and Coordination for the University of California's Office of the President. Her new appointment is effective Jan. 7.

Adam Margolin, PhD, has been named professor and chair of the Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences and senior associate dean of precision medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Dr. Margolin will also lead the Icahn Institute for Data Science and Genomic Technology. He is currently director of computational biology and professor of biomedical engineering at OHSU.
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Anil Menon, PhD, has been named associate dean for baccalaureate education in the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Dr. Menon is a professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology at the College of Medicine.
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Remember last week's story about the stolen colon – a giant, inflatable educational tool? It was recovered, reported a tweet from the Kansas City Police. If you would like to lose 10 minutes of your life to the void known as social media, scroll through the associated twitter feed, but only if you haven't eaten for a while. Also, many tweets observed that the colon, as shown in photos, is technically a semicolon.
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And finally, while Halloween exited stage left Wednesday, it's not too late to scream one last time via AI-generated tales from beyond. IFLScience reports on the work of a team at Botnik studios who have deployed AI to use language from R.L. Stine's Goosebumps series of children's chillers to compose "original" horror stories. It may not quite scare you into believing AI will take away your job anytime soon ("Do you dare beat feet through scary woods? If you do, you might get a magic sword. Or even a soda can from a ghostly horse. But how will you hold either when your hands are made of sand?"), but it makes for some amusing reading.
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Find more news items on AAMC's Research Clips page, and visit the CFAS Resources page for an archive of the previous four editions of CFAS News as well as our People of Academic Medicine page, which features a running list of academic promotions, appointments, and departures.

Your comments and news tips are always welcome. Please email them to Eric Weissman at eweissman@aamc.org.

Read the previous edition of CFAS News.

Eric Weissman
Senior Director, Faculty and Academic Society Engagement
AAMC
eweissman@aamc.org
www.aamc.org/members/cfas

Alex Bolt
CFAS Communications Specialist
AAMC
abolt@aamc.org

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