aamc.org does not support this web browser.
  • Affinity Group

    CFAS News Current Edition

    Monkeypox Emergencies Declared; AAMC Releases Report on Sexual Harassment in Med Ed; AAMC Leads Amicus Brief Supporting Race Consideration in Admissions; and Other Items of Interest

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has designated the monkeypox outbreak as a global health emergency after it spread to dozens of countries and infected tens of thousands, reported the New York Times. This is the second time in two years the WHO has taken what was once considered to be an extraordinary step of declaring a disease to be a global health emergency.
    Read More

    In addition, the state of New York and the city of San Francisco have announced public health emergencies associated with monkeypox, reported the Washington Post. The moves allow various local health authorities more access to resources and to increase urgency around better access to vaccines and testing resources. And Reuters announced that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) plans to make monkeypox a nationally notifiable condition as of Aug. 1, which would help monitor and track disease.
    Read More
    Read More

    Physicians are calling for the search for monkeypox cases to look beyond gay and bisexual men, reported CNN. On a related note, NPR emphasized the importance of knowing the difference between warning and stigmatizing people during the monkeypox outbreak.
    Read More
    Read More

    The AAMC, along with 45 health professional and educational organizations, has submitted an amicus curiae brief to the U.S. Supreme Court in support of the limited consideration of an applicant’s racial or ethnic background or experiences in higher education admissions. The amicus brief focuses on the particular importance of racial and ethnic diversity in the health professions in classrooms, labs, and clinical settings to improve the overall health of our nation. “Numerous studies have consistently demonstrated health inequities along racial and ethnic lines in nearly every index of human health, and evidence shows that increased racial diversity in the health professions can help close that gap,” said AAMC President and CEO David J. Skorton, MD. “The AAMC has long supported the limited consideration of race and ethnicity in admissions where necessary and in support of a medical school’s mission, with deference to each school’s individualized admissions process and expertise.”
    Read More
    Read More
    Read More

    The AAMC released a new report, Understanding and Addressing Sexual Harassment in Academic Medicine, which found that, between 2019 and 2021, 34% of women faculty and 22% of faculty overall reported experiencing sexual harassment. The report is intended to increase understanding of the prevalence and experiences of sexual harassment among U.S. medical school faculty in the workplace and to explore promising institutional practices to prevent and address harassment.
    Read More
    Read More

    The House of Representatives passed the Advancing Telehealth Beyond COVID-19 Act of 2022 to extend telehealth reimbursement flexibilities created during the pandemic for two more years, reported Modern Healthcare.
    Read More

    The AAMC issued a statement on the passage. “The AAMC applauds the House for passing the Advancing Telehealth Beyond COVID-19 Act of 2022, which will extend coverage of telehealth services under Medicare until at least December 31, 2024. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, patients nationwide have benefited from increased access to telehealth services and this bill will ensure that this crucial point of access continues. The legislation serves as an important milestone for expanding telehealth services to more people in rural, urban, and other underserved communities by extending the suspension of geographic restrictions on patients. It also ensures access to critical services for patients by allowing Medicare to continue paying for audio-only services, including for behavioral health therapy,” said AAMC President and CEO David J. Skorton, MD.
    Read More

    The AAMC has named the recipients of its 2022 Telehealth Equity Catalyst Awards and Pilot Grants. Ten programs were selected to receive $15,000 each to fund existing programs or begin development of pilot proposals.
    Read More

    Hospitals are struggling with staff shortages as federal COVID-19 funds dry up and BA.5 cases drive up admissions and deaths, reported Politico.
    Read More

    As the pandemic enters its third year and 1 in 5 infected American adults battle lingering symptoms, doctors with disabilities are pushing the medical field to improve its treatment of disabled professionals who are also battling long COVID-19, and need accommodations at work to continue to stay in the profession to provide care for the increasing number of people facing the mysterious condition, reported Time.
    Read More

    Medscape additionally covered hospital programs that are addressing the mental health effects of long COVID-19.
    Read More

    The Boston Globe reported on new studies that support the theory that the coronavirus emerged zoonotically. And a new study published in Science and covered by the Washington Post also reinforced the theory that the virus originated specifically from the Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market in Wuhan.
    Read More
    Read More
    Read More

    “[A]cross the small towns and farmlands, new research has found, Covid killed Black and Hispanic people at considerably higher rates than it did their white neighbors. Even at the end of the pandemic’s second year, in February 2022, overstretched health systems, poverty, chronic illnesses and lower vaccination rates were forcing nonwhite people to bear the burden of the virus,” reported the New York Times.
    Read More

    BMJ published an article on the ongoing value of, and increased interest in, sewage surveillance in an age of viral diseases such as COVID-19, monkeypox, and now polio. The piece notes that there’s nothing new about sewage surveillance, which was an important part of tracking polio in the early 20th century.
    Read More

    The nomination of Arati Prabhakar, PhD, to lead the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy has advanced to the Senate floor for a final vote, reports the American Institute of Physics.
    Read More

    NPR covered a study in the Annals in Internal Medicine exploring the costs to survivors and family members associated with nonfatal gun violence. The study looked specifically at changes in health care spending after gun injury and drew linkages related to averages and severity of injury. The National Institutes of Health-funded study was conducted by faculty and researchers at Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, and University of Michigan.
    Read More
    Read More

    H. Holden Thorp, editor-in-chief of Science, published an editorial on the apparent incongruity between the U.S. founding documents and the “insatiable desire” for technological, scientific, and biomedical innovation and advancement. While the public and industry demands innovation, the courts and political apparatus have a hard time keeping up and reconciling the conflicts innovation can create.
    Read More

    A comment in Nature Methods discussed why it’s important to study human-monkey embryonic chimeras in a dish.
    Read More

    Monday marked 50 years since news broke of the infamous “Tuskegee Study” and the Associated Press ran a piece about Jean Heller, the AP journalist who originally broke the story. The article noted that Heller was randomly handed a thin manila folder by a colleague and that “[in]side were documents telling a tale that, even today, staggers the imagination: For four decades, the U.S. government had denied hundreds of poor, Black men treatment for syphilis so researchers could study its ravages on the human body. The U.S. Public Health Service called it ‘The Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male.’ The world would soon come to know it simply as the ‘Tuskegee Study’ — one of the biggest medical scandals in U.S. history, an atrocity that continues to fuel mistrust of government and health care among Black Americans.”
    Read More

    The Wall Street Journal reported on nonprofit hospitals writing off less of their patient revenue on financial aid for patients’ medical bills than their for-profit competitors. American Hospital Association CEO Rick Pollack issued a statement in response to the WSJ article, saying that it “fails to recognize that charity care is only one part of a hospital’s total community benefit,” reported Becker’s Hospital CFO Report.
    Read More
    Read More

    What started as an investigation into potentially fraudulent claims about an experimental Alzheimer’s drug led Matthew Schrag, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of neurology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, down a rabbit hole that challenged the findings of one of the most cited Alzheimer’s studies of this century and numerous related experiments. Science covered the story.
    Read More

    Nature Communications Medicine featured insights from people who were involved in clinical trials in a variety of roles, shedding light on how patient involvement in clinical trials can maximize the success of the trials and improve the patient experience.
    Read More

    Dozens of medical students from University of Michigan Medical School walked out of a white coat ceremony to protest Kristin Collier, MD, an assistant professor of medicine, who was the keynote speaker, because of her views opposing abortion, reported the Associated Press. Dr. Collier didn’t refer to abortion in her speech but had written a post on social media earlier this year that said, “Holding on to a view of feminism where one fights for the rights of all women and girls, especially those who are most vulnerable. I can’t not lament the violence directed at my prenatal sisters in the act of abortion, done in the name of autonomy.”
    Read More

    Providers are divided over the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ (CMS’) potential response to the Supreme Court decision that invalidated cuts to 340B payments, with some cheering the reversal of the cuts and others arguing that the CMS road map is irresponsible and that the agency would be justified paying even less for 340B drugs, reported Modern Healthcare. 340B continues to be an advocacy priority for the AAMC.
    Read More
    Read More

    Some experts and lawmakers want the Food and Drug Administration to do more to implement recommendations from a 2016 National Academies of Sciences review on prescription painkillers as the opioid epidemic shows no signs of abating, reported Modern Healthcare.
    Read More

    Teva Pharmaceuticals, one of the country’s biggest manufacturers of generic opioids, announced a settlement in principle with thousands of local governments, states, and tribes worth up to $4.25 billion over its role in the opioid epidemic, reported the New York Times.
    Read More

    MedPage Today covered how the Department of Health and Human Services is seeking to broaden the Affordable Care Act’s nondiscrimination provisions.
    Read More

    Time reported that there is a worsening physician shortage in America and explored potential solutions such as increased funding, debt relief, expanding the care team, and reducing the paperwork burden, among other steps.
    Read More

    A new initiative, DocsWithDisabilities, has launched as a first-of-its-kind coordinated effort to systematically improve the inclusion of disabled individuals in health professions education. “The AAMC is committed to fostering a diverse, equitable, and inclusive physician workforce, and that includes people with disabilities. We are pleased to support the DocsWithDisabilities Initiative in its efforts to address and remove common barriers in training and to provide a platform for improving disability inclusion,” said David J. Skorton, MD, AAMC president and CEO, in a press release announcing the launch.
    Read More

    An episode in Kaiser Health News’ “American Diagnosis” podcast discussed the resilience of Indigenous peoples in the United States and how they’re taking action to protect the health and well-being of their communities.
    Read More

    Medical Economics explored how to improve electronic health records (EHRs) to mitigate physician burnout. It focused in part on how EHR tools need to focus on clinician efficiency and driving down costs.
    Read More

    Medscape explored how to get the most out of medical mentorships.
    Read More

    AAMCNews discussed how hospitals and medical organizations are taking steps to reduce greenhouse gases, including changing anesthesia, fixing valves, and resterilizing devices.
    Read More

    VaccineVoices, a project of the AAMC and the CDC, explained why improving telehealth access is key to health equity, since many U.S. adults can’t access digital health tools and technology and are being left behind.
    Read More

    The Targeted Real-Time Early Warning System, developed by Johns Hopkins University and Bayesian Health, used artificial intelligence and a machine learning system to diagnose and treat cases of sepsis earlier than traditional methods, leading to a 20% decrease in mortality among sepsis patients, reported Modern Healthcare.
    Read More

    The August edition of Academic Medicine is online and features content on the partnership between the Department of Veterans Affairs and academic medicine, mental health history and stigma, the concept of shame, and creating a culture of anti-racism, among other topics.
    Read More

    The Interprofessional Education Collaborative Faculty Development Institute will be held Sept. 28-30 in Washington, D.C.
    Read More

    Early bird registration for Learn Serve Lead 2022: The AAMC Annual Meeting, in Nashville, Nov. 11-15, will end next week. This event draws thousands of attendees from across the academic medicine community to connect with thought leaders, spark conversation on critical issues impacting medical education and patient care, and encourage collaborations that influence the future of health. Numerous sessions are relevant to CFAS reps and medical school faculty across the board.
    Read More

    Registration is open for the AAMC Mid-Career Minority Faculty Leadership Seminar — a program designed specifically for mid-career faculty who aspire to leadership positions in academic medicine. The seminar consists of both virtual learning sessions/webinars and an in-person meeting from Oct. 13-15 at the AAMC Learning Center in Washington, D.C. The early bird registration discount ends Sept. 7.
    Read More

    The AAMC is hosting a free virtual event on Sept. 7 at noon ET to explore how the academic medicine community is addressing and eradicating systemic racism in health care. The discussion will be moderated by Malika Fair, MD, MPH, AAMC senior director of equity and social accountability, and will include Nahae Kim, MPH, a medical student at Chicago Medical School at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, as well as individuals featured in the documentary The Color of Care, including Ala Stanford, MD, Hetty Cunningham, MD, and Keith Gambrell. Advance registration is required (space is limited).
    Read More

    Irina Burd, MD, PhD, has been named chair of the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Services at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. Burd is a professor of gynecology and obstetrics and the founding director of the Integrated Research Center for Fetal Medicine at Johns Hopkins Medicine.
    Read More

    J. Marc Simard, MD, PhD, has been appointed interim chair of the Department of Physiology at University of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. Simard is the Dr. Bizhan Aarabi Professor of Neurotrauma, and a professor of neurosurgery, pathology, and physiology at the UMSOM.
    Read More

    Rebekah Gundry, PhD, has been named interim chair of the University of Nebraska Medical Center’s Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology and interim director of the Center for Heart and Vascular Research. Dr. Gundry previously served as vice chair of the department and professor and assistant chief for basic and translational research in the UNMC Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Read More

    Jessica Snowden, MD, has been appointed vice dean for research at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Medicine. Dr. Snowden is a professor and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases in the UAMS College of Medicine’s Department of Pediatrics.
    Read More

    Tina Simpson, MD, has been named the first chief clinical diversity officer at Tulane University School of Medicine, effective Oct. 1. Dr. Simpson currently serves as vice chair of faculty development in the Department of Pediatrics and director of the Adolescent Medicine Training Program at University of Alabama at Birmingham Marnix E. Heersink School of Medicine.
    Read More

    Anja Katrin Bielinksy, PhD, has been appointed interim chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics at the University of Virginia School of Medicine. Dr. Bielinksy previously served as a professor in the Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Biophysics at the University Minnesota Medical School.
    Read More

    Renée Shellhaas, MD, has been named associate dean for faculty promotions and career development at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, effective in Oct. Dr. Shellhaas is an associate chair for career development and a pediatric neurologist at the University of Michigan.
    Read More

    There’s a white board in a conference room at Boston Children’s Hospital that has a year written at the top of all the usual white board-esque scribbling: 2007. And to the right is a friendly request: “Please do not erase J.F.” That J.F. is physician-scientist Judah Folkman, MD, the hospital’s former chief of surgery and a fabled cancer researcher, who has since passed away. The white board, which sketches out some of his ideas leading to a “raft” of cancer treatments, has just celebrated its 15th year of not being erased, reported the Boston Globe. A sheet of plexiglass over the board helps ensure people will take the polite request seriously.
    Read More

    And finally, the New York Times covered the conflicted practice of ringside physicians — who even have their own academic society: the Association of Ringside Physicians (not yet a CFAS member). These watchful docs are integral in determining whether a mixed martial arts fight will go on after an especially gruesome injury in the ring. The piece notes it’s not always an easy decision to make in front of an arena full of screaming fans, and the heckling can be intense when a fight gets called, even on doctor’s orders.
    Read More
    Read More 

    Visit the CFAS Resources page for an archive of the previous edition of CFAS News as well as our People of Academic Medicine page, which features a running list of academic promotions, appointments, and departures.

    Your comments and news tips are always welcome. Please email them to Eric Weissman at eweissman@aamc.org.

    Read the previous edition of CFAS News.

    Eric Weissman
    Senior Director, Faculty and Academic Society Engagement
    AAMC
    eweissman@aamc.org
    www.aamc.org/cfas