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2015 Information Technology in Academic Medicine Conference - All Available Presentations


The following presentations were given at the 2015 Information Technology in Academic Medicine Conference, June 3-5, 2015. The presentations on this page are listed in the order in which they were presented.

Please note that you must "log into" this page using your AAMC ID to access the presentations. You may do so at the upper right hand corner of this page.

June 3, 2015 Presentations (June 4 and 5 Presentations also below)


GIR Leadership Institute Pre-Conference Workshop

Managing information technology initiatives, projects and services in an academic environment is a complex undertaking. The ability to effectively analyze needs, build consensus, and develop strong partnerships is critical to success. This workshop, open to all graduates and faculty of the GIR Leadership Institute, continued the professional development pathway for technology leaders in academic medicine.

  • Jill Jemison, Technology Services Director, University of Vermont College of Medicine - Presentation (log in to access).

Pre-Conference New Attendee Orientation Session

An introduction to the Conference, the Group on Information Resources (GIR), and the AAMC.

  • Ethan Kendrick, AAMC - Presentation (log in to access).

Opening Plenary Session - Disruptive Technologies in Medical Education: Hope or Hype?

Is Dr. McCoy’s tricorder in our immediate future? Disruptive technologies such as 3D modeling, scanning and printing; gaming; data visualization; virtual dissection and surgery; mobile apps; citizen science and biohacking; and wearable technologies have the potential to revolutionize the practice of medicine. How many of these technologies will actually come to fruition? How soon? Where should exposure to these technologies fit into an already packed med school curriculum? How do we encourage our students to use and advance these technologies? This plenary session explored disruptive technologies and lead a conversation regarding the hope and hype surrounding them.

  • Maria C. Savoia, MD, Dean of Medical Education, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine
  • Warren Wiechmann, MD, MBA, Associate Dean of Instructional Technologies, University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine
  • Presentations and Audio Recording (log in to access).

Curriculum Management Systems for Competency-Based Programs

This panel presentation focuses on the use of available curriculum management systems to support competency-based medical education, tracing their history from simple curriculum mapping tools to today’s highly integrated platforms, highlighting relevant system capabilities, identifying major needs, and addressing the challenges and opportunities medical schools face in implementing them.

  • Terri Cameron, MA, AAMC
  • Sam Chan, Acting Director, Information Technology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto
  • Matt Simpson, Faculty of Health Sciences, Queen's University
  • Dan Zollman, PEng, PMP, Principal, AMBiT Consulting Inc.

Deploying Centralized Enterprise Research Applications & High-Performance Computing in an Academic Medical Center

In traditionally decentralized academic research environments, leveraging centralized enterprise applications and services may be limited or non-existent. PennMedicine has taken the initiative to leverage key enterprise systems and high-performance computing resources for campus-wide use. This session will provide an overview of this journey, with the goal of greater data integration as the endpoint.

  • Jason Hughes, MBA, MS, Director, Enterprise Research Applications, Penn Medicine - Presentation (log in to access).

Digital Innovation: A Team For the Future

Digital Natives and Digital Immigrants demand products from AMCs that go beyond traditional IT group capabilities. Organizing an unconventional coalition of talents with existing resources from disparate teams, can be a way to meet this demand. This presentation is on how to build and sustain such a Digital Innovation team.

  • Swapna Charavarthy, Asst. Vice President, Integrated Data Management, USF Morsani College of Medicine
  • Alice Wei, Director of Digital Innovations, USF Morsani College of Medicine
  • Joint Presentation (log in to access).

Tales from the Flip: Media Production Strategies, Operational Methods, Support and Governance Models

Short demonstrations of media produced by UBC and UCalgary for flexible learning interventions, roadmapping implementation and lessons learned. Facilitation of a discussion on flipped classroom approaches at other schools, generally, and specifically on media/video production strategies within the medical school context.

  • Michael Paget, BFA, Manager of eLearning, University of Calgary Cumming School of Medicine
  • Wayne Rosen, MD, MSc, FRCSC, FASCRS, Clinical Assistant Professor of Surgery, Cumming School Of Medicine, University of Calgary
  • Gary Rosborough, MEd, B Ed (ADED), Senior Manager, Educational Technology, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia
  • Zachary Rothman, Producer, Video and Digital Media, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia
  • Joint Presentation (log in to access).

Using Controlled Vocabularies to Improve Data Flow and Analytics

From ICD codes to MeSH, academic medical centers have a long history of using controlled vocabularies throughout the missions. Data governance-driven efforts can enable and extended the use of controlled vocabularies to include core operational data and significantly improve dataflow across systems and analytics efforts

  • Theodora A. Bakker, MS, Program Director, Enterprise Data Quality, North Shore-LIJ - Presentation (log in to access).

AAMC Services Update

Updates on the American Medical College Application Service® (AMCAS®), AAMC's medical school application processing service and Curriculum Inventory and Reports (CIR), part of the AAMC's Medical Academic Performance Services (MedAPS) initiative.

  • Kelly Begatto, AMCAS, AAMC - Presentation (log in to access).
  • Terri Cameron, MA, Curriculum Inventory, AAMC - Presentation (log in to access).

ePoster: A "CLER" Strategy for Success: A Novel Health IT Quality Elective Enables Residents to Leverage Health IT tools on a Collaborative Project and Satisfy the CLER GME Program

As part of the Clinical Learning Environment Review Program (CLER), GME programs are assessed in how they incorporate quality improvement initiatives in the curriculum. In this presentation, we describe an innovative elective entitled QIPS (Quality Improvement Patient Safety). Residents spend two week blocks leveraging EHR and analytical tools to complete sequential phases of a PDSA cycle

  • Sarah MacArthur, MD, Chief Resident, Internal Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center

ePoster: Clinical Problem Solving Card Game with Randomized Data

We rebooted case based teaching, simulation and virtual patients with a clinical problem solving card game. The success of this mobile friendly web application is based on its powerful replayability, speed of authorship and segmenting the cognitive load on players. This presentation will review the development, deployment and assessment of the application.

  • Michael Paget, BFA, Manager of eLearning, University of Calgary Cumming School of Medicine - Presentation (log in to access).

ePoster: Information-Driven Decisions In A Self-Service Business Intelligence Environment

Medical school educators and leaders require analysis of student performance to make key decisions. This presentation details how we introduce self-service business intelligence (BI) workflow to users who have analytic expertise to enable greater user information-driven decision-making.

  • Marina Marin, MSc, Lead Information Management Developer, New York University School of Medicine
  • Suvam Paul, Data Analyst, New York University School of Medicine
  • Sandra Yingling, PhD, Division Manager, Institute for Innovations in Medical Education, New York University School of Medicine

ePoster: Visualizing a Competency/Curriculum Map in Real time to View Teaching and Learning Curricular Components and Competencies Delivered using TUSK, Tufts University Sciences Knowledge-base and Other Open Source Tools

Visualizing a Competency/Curriculum Map in Real time helps curriculum planners, students and faculty understand the curriculum and the relevance of its parts to school and national competencies. A visualization tool in TUSK makes the Curriculum Inventory, an XML file, human readable. This presentation details one way to accomplish this goal.

  • Susan Albright, BA, Director, Technology for Learning in the Health Sciences, Tufts University - Presentation (log in to access).

June 4, 2015 Presentations


Plenary Session - Evidence Generating Medicine: Integrating Research and Practice with Informatics to Enable a Learning Health System

Advances in health IT and biomedical informatics have laid the groundwork for significant improvements in healthcare and research. Electronic Health Records (EHRs) can be used not only enable evidence-based medicine (EBM), but to accelerate clinical research and facilitate the generation of evidence needed to improve healthcare quality. By applying novel informatics approaches to enable an Evidence Generating Medicine (EGM) paradigm alongside EBM, it is becoming possible to accelerate both research and healthcare improvement, thereby completing a virtuous EBM life-cycle. In this presentation, Dr. Embi explored these concepts, presented examples of EHR-based, point-of-care solutions that have been shown to facilitate research during busy practice, and discussed next steps to advancing Informatics-driven EGM and EBM solutions to enable learning health systems.

  • Peter J. Embi, MD, MS, FACP, FACMI, Associate Professor and Vice Chair, Department of Biomedical Informatics, Chief Research Information Officer, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center
  • Presentation and Audio Recording (log in to access).

Evolving IT Governance while Balancing Centralized and Decentralized Services and Support

This presentation compared and contrasted implementations of IT Governance in a new medical school and an older medical school. In one case, IT governance must help create new IT culture. In the other, IT governance must change entrenched IT culture. Each situation presents unique challenges.

  • Dennis Schmidt, MS, Assistant Dean for Information Technology, University of North Carolina - Presentation (log in to access).

Maturity and Deployment Indexes in Medical Education Technology

This session described maturity and deployment indexes for education technology that have been developed by a team of GIR members from multiple institutions. The session presented the indexes and associated concepts and actively engaged the attendees to test the viability and applicability of the indexes.

  • Jennifer Calzada, Director for Simulation, Tulane University School of Medicine
  • Boyd Knosp, MS, Associate Dean for Information Technology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine
  • Jill Mantia, Executive Director of User Services Department of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Joint Presentation (log in to access).

Real-world Deployment of Standards-based EHR-enabled Research Infrastructures

Open, vendor-supported interoperability standards that enable the use of EHRs in clinical research are maturing, and several academic medical centers are in the process of implementation. This presentation discussed the implementation of these standards at three centers, including the preparation and governance processes, prerequisites and lessons learned so far.

  • Diana Gumas, MS, Senior Director, Clinical Research IT, Johns Hopkins Medicine - Presentation (log in to access).
  • Iain Sanderson, MD, Vice Dean, Research Informatics, Duke University School of Medicine - Presentation (log in to access).
  • John Speakman, Senior Director, Research Information Technology, New York University Langone Medical Center - Presentation (log in to access).

Research Data Management

The need to manage data that is discoverable across research teams and organizations creates challenges and opportunities for data storage, access, security, migration, repurposing, and sharing. The presentation features case studies of how some institutions developed protocols to manage these large systems and strategies for curation to ensure data integrity.

  • Jason Hughes, MBA, MS, Director, Enterprise Research Applications, Penn Medicine
  • Terence Ma, PhD, Assistant Dean for Educational Information Resources, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Cristina Pope, Library Director, Upstate Medical Center
  • Neil Rambo, Director, Health Sciences Library, NYU Langone Medical Center
  • Shailesh Shenoy, Senior Associate, Director of High Performance Computing, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Joint Presentation (log in to access).

Data Driven Academic Medical Centers: A Data Driven Panel Discussion

Dashboards, performance reports, integrated multi-mission scorecards – many organizations have invested or are starting data-driven initiatives to facilitate decision making and opportunities to identify and realize greater efficiencies. This panel led a discussion of challenges, opportunities, and lessons learned.

  • Theodora A. Bakker, MS, Program Director, Enterprise Data Quality, North Shore-LIJ
  • Patricia M. Deasy, Director, Administrative Systems Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford School of Medicine
  • Ted Hanss, Chief Information Officer, University of Michigan
  • Marc Overcash, Assistant Dean, Information Technology, Emory University
  • Joint Presentation (log in to access).

How Can Academic Medical Centers Best Optimize Clinical Data for Research and Operations?

This presentation highlighted the evolution enterprise research data strategy at several different academic medical centers. As researchers’ data needs become more complex, AMCs have established groups that provide data management for clinical trials, data extraction from the clinical data warehouse, and enterprise level data curation.

  • Michael Cantor, MD, MA, Director, Clinical Research Informatics, NYU School of Medicine - Presentation (log in to access).
  • Sheri Chernetsky Tejedor, MD, SFHM, Chief Research Information Officer , Medical Director for Analytics, Emory University School of Medicine - Presentation (log in to access).
  • Daniel Schneider, Manager of Research Analysts, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine - Presentation (log in to acccess).

Real Time Curriculum Assessment

How does one ensure that there is alignment between what we purport is important for students to learn, and what we actually evaluate? Our novel technological approach mines the relationship between content, the teacher, delivery method, cohort and individual performance on ILOs, PLOs, CLOs, and licensing board exam performance.

  • Scott Helf, DO, MSIT, Chief Technology Officer, Assistant Dean of Academic Informatics, Western University of Health Sciences College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific - Presentation (log in to access).

Simulation Maturity Model: First Collect the Metrics to Create a Reliable Model and Accurately Assess Your Simulation Center

The GIR’s SAM-SIG created a maturity model survey tool for AMC simulation centers. In this session, faculty discussed and demonstrated methodology to accurately capture and assess data that can be used to complete the maturity model and develop reports for annual reports, administration, determining staffing requirements, AND complete the maturity model.

  • Jennifer Calzada, Director for Simulation, Tulane University School of Medicine
  • Sandra Feaster, RN, MS, MBA, Assistant Dean, Stanford University School of Medicine
  • John Lutz, Director of Information Technology, University of Pittsburgh
  • Joint Presentation (log in to access).

So You Have a Pair of Google Glass (Or the Next Best Thing)…Now What?

A successful implementation requires buy-in from stakeholders throughout the institution. This panel discussed Google Glass case studies that highlight different institutional and technical concerns about adopting this technology.

  • Warren Wiechmann, MD, MBA, Associate Dean of Instructional Technologies, University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine
  • Julie Youm, PhD, Director, Instructional Technologies Group, University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine
  • Joint Presentation (log in to access).

GIR Business Lunch

Updates on activities from the past year by the GIR and the Group's priorities for the year ahead.

  • Boyd Knosp, MS, Associate Dean for Information Technology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine (GIR Chair)
  • Ted Hanss, Chief Information Officer, University of Michigan (GIR Incoming Chair)
  • Joint Presentation (log in to access).

ePoster: Developing Visualizations to Evaluate Emory School of Medicine Across Multiple Missions

Emory School of Medicine has created dashboards to deliver reports and visualizations integrating multiple disparate, yet authoritative data sources. These visualizations aim to create a more streamlined, data driven process for decision-making across the school’s three missions of medical education, biomedical research, and clinical care.

  • Susan Hobson, Research Informatics Analyst, Emory University
  • Jeff Weaver, Director, Data Solutions, Emory University - Presentation (log in to access).

ePoster: EmergentMD: A Suite of Semantic Web-Based Tools for the Development and Intelligent Consumption of Medical Education Content

EmergentMD attempts to leverage semantic web technology to help students discover and more deeply understand interrelationships among complex medical concepts. The software consists of a suite of tools for (1) ontology development, (2) educational content development, (3) semantic tagging of content, and (4) web-based, intelligent content retrieval for students.

  • Michael Blechner, MD, Assistant Professor of Pathology, University of Connecticut School of Medicine - Presentation (log in to access).

ePoster: Student Technology Committee: Supporting Students as Stakeholders in Medical Education Technology

Students should have an integral role in advancing medical education technology to improve training for 21st-century physicians. Our student-led technology committee model harnesses students’ valuable input in a systemic fashion that affords meaningful contributions to an institution’s education ecology, while generating substantial benefits for committee members and faculty.

  • S. Toufeeq Ahmed, PhD, MS, Director of Education Informatics & Assistant Professor, Vanderbilt University
  • Amol Utrankar, MD Candidate, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
  • Joint Presentation (log in to access).

ePoster: The Response and Recovery App in Washington (RRAIN): A Statewide Disaster Information Partnership

The RRAIN Washington mobile app helps first responders during disaster events by providing an authoritative mobile knowledge base. This state-wide collaboration between public health leaders, first responders, and academic health sciences library-based information professionals provides access to National Library of Medicine resources and state-specific information and situational awareness tools.

  • Emily Glenn, MSLS, AHIP, Community Health Outreach Coordinator, University of Washington Health Sciences Library - Presentation (log in to access).

A Tale of Two Universities – Tools for Managing Research Services

A panel discussion comparing tools for research core facility management. These tools (SPARC and iLabs) provide standard service interfaces for core facility services and track resource utilization for billing and compliance. This session compared and contrasted the experiences in implementing these tools at two different academic medical centers.

  • Heather Davis, MLIS, ITIL, Lead Project Manager, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine - Presentation (log in to access).
  • Abhijeet Malatpure, Principal Systems Analyst, Advanced Biomedical IT Core, Indiana University - Presentation (log in to access).

Electronic Integration at the Core- Insight and Adaptation of EMR Activities within Second Year Medical Student Curriculum

This presentation discussed the adaptation and perception changes from second year medical students who participated in a yearlong – curriculum based EMR activity. The presenters shared their challenges, successes and future enhancements as we continue to expand their curriculum into the third and fourth year.

  • Sara Weitzel, MS, Assistant Director of Educational Technologies, University of Florida
  • Christine Marin, ARNP, MBA, Clinical Instructional Designer, University of Florida

Implementing Master Data Governance for Providers and Faculty

An integrated academic medical center implemented an industry-standard technology platform for master data management (MDM) to introduce greater formalism in provider and faculty data governance. This has enabled the data-driven organization to improve data quality and standardization, and strengthen data governance.

  • Rajan Chandras, Director Data Architecture and Strategy, NYU Langone Medical Center
  • Swetha Nukala, MPH, Director, Clinical Quality Analysis and Data Governance, NYU Langone Medical Center
  • Joint Presentation (log in to access).

Sharing Decisions Points: Lessons Learned During a Sophisticated Cyber Attack

During the Summer of 2013, we went through a highly sophisticated cyber attack that resulted in a number of compromised systems (non-Healthcare related). In the process, there were a number of key decisions that the institution had to make that I thought would be helpful to share with the community.

  • Marc Overcash, Assistant Dean, Information Technology, Emory University - Presentation (log in to access).

June 5, 2015 Presentations


Innovators & Adapters: Emerging IT Models to Support Academic Life Sciences Research

As data-driven research expands, the IT needs of academic researchers also expands. This session provided insight into how the University of Pennsylvania is supporting academic life sciences through a centralized IT model.

  • Jason Hughes, MBA, MS, Director, Enterprise Research Applications, Penn Medicine - Presentation (log in to access).

Re-imagining Academic Medicine IT: Listening First

All aspects of Academic Medicine are supported by technology. Often, IT resource decision-making paradigms create environments where programs, departments and centers compete and meaningful engagement of the key stakeholders (clinicians, researchers and/or educators) may be overlooked. UBC’s Future of IT initiative aims to address this engagement vacuum head-on.

  • Mike Allard, Professor and Head, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia
  • David Lampron, MBA, Director, IT, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia
  • Joint Presentation (log in to access).

Secure Document Sharing and Collaboration in the Cloud; Three Stories from AHCs

The profusion of cloud-based collaboration services presents a conundrum to academic health centers. Their ease of use and low cost tempt researchers, educators, and practitioners to use them despite legal, security, and regulatory issues. In this presentation, three institutions discussed how they have embraced cloud document sharing and collaboration services at their AHCs.

  • William Barnett, PhD, Interim Chief Research Information Officer, Indiana University - Presentation (log in to access).
  • Bob Flynn, Manager, Cloud Technology Support, Indiana University - Presentation (log in to access).
  • Michael Halaas, Chief Information Officer, Stanford University School of Medicine - Presentation (log in to access).
  • Ted Hanss, Chief Information Officer, University of Michigan Medical School - Presentation (log in to access).

Technical Challenges in Uploading to the Curriculum Inventory

The Curriculum Inventory (CI) is an international repository for US and Canadian medical school curriculum data that offers resources for curriculum planning, renewal, management and oversight, as well as for educational research and legislative and media queries. This session used small groups to document existing and potential technical challenges in uploading to the Curriculum Inventory and develop solutions to those challenges.

  • Jose Lopez, Associate Director of Academic Technology, Texas Tech Health Sciences Center El Paso
  • Terence Ma, PhD, Assistant Dean for Educational Information Resources, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Johmarx Patton, MD, MHI, Director of Learning Informatics, Medical School Information Services, University of Michigan Medical School
  • Joint Presentation (log in to access).

Voting by Clicks: Plan, Design, and Implement Online Learning Modules to Support Active and Individualized Learning in Medical Education

In this presenation, three institutions described their experiences with planning, designing, implementing online learning modules including the technical, pedagogical and instructional challenges/solutions of establishing effective ways to deliver educational content to support active and individualized learning in medical education.

  • Sabrina Lee, Director, Division of Educational Informatics, NYU Langone Medical Center
  • Helen Macfarlane, Director, Education Technology, University of Colorado School of Medicine
  • Shannon Manley, Project Manager, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine
  • So-Young Oh, Instructional Designer, NYU Langone Medical Center
  • Joint Presentation (log in to access).

Closing Plenary Session - The Information C-Suite Shares Strategies

Everyone involved in the academic medicine data enterprise has an important role, but they need to be aligned, speak the same language, and share the same mission. How do you make data from the different missions of our institutions, the teams that manage and create those data, and the infrastructure where those data live, come together to advance organizational goals? This session featured leading experts in academic medicine discussing the strategies needed for effective data leadership and governance.

  • William Barnett, PhD, Interim Chief Research Information Officer, Indiana University
  • Lucila Ohno-Machado, MD, PhD, Chair, Department of Biomedical Informatics, Associate Dean for Informatics and Technology, UC San Diego School of Medicine
  • Paul Testa, MD, JD, MPH, Chief Medical Information Officer, NYU Langone Medical Center
  • Ted Hanss, Chief Information Officer, University of Michigan Medical School
  • Audio Recording of this Session (log in to access).

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Upcoming and Recent Events

2018 GIR Leadership Institute
February 27-March 2, 2018
AAMC Learning Center
Washington, D.C.
Now Accepting Applications

2018 Information Technology in Academic Medicine Conference
June 5-8, 2018
Westin Austin Downtown
Austin, Texas
Call for Proposals Now Open

2017 Learn Serve Lead: The AAMC Annual Meeting
November 3-7, 2017
Boston, Mass.

2017 GBA/GIP/GIR Joint Spring Meeting
May 9-12, 2017
Hyatt Regency Atlanta
Atlanta, Ga.
Presentations Available to Attendees