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Association of American Medical Colleges Tomorrow's Doctors, Tomorrow's Cures®

2015 Health Equity Research Snapshot

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2014 Health Equity Research Snapshot

Focus on Mental Health Research

Health and health care inequities affect various populations across a wide range of diseases and health outcomes, including mental health and psychiatric illnesses. Various influences including genetic, familial, cultural and environmental factors contribute to group differences in the prevalence of mental illness and the outcomes of treatment.

The 2015 health equity research snapshot spotlights seven new federally funded research projects underway at AAMC-member institutions. We solicited these videos from researchers and their teams to demonstrate the diverse research efforts that aim to understand and eliminate mental health inequities.

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Together, these video clips show how all types of science can contribute solutions to mental health and health care disparities. Roll over each topic to see more.
Neuropsychiatry Research

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Women Veterans

Minneapolis VA Medical Center

Suicide Prevention in Chinese Older Adults

Northwestern University at Chicago and Rush University Medical Center
Intervention Research

Implementing health promotion activities within a mental health center

Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth
Implementation Research

Implementing mental health evidence-based practices in urban schools

The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Community Based Research

Identifying multilevel protective factors for LGBT youth in North America

University of Minnesota Medical School
Health Policy Research

Researching the effects of state and federal insurance policies on autism care

Penn State Hershey College of Medicine
Genetics Research

Familial, genetic and environmental influences of major depression in African-Americans

New York State Psychiatric Institute (Columbia University College of Physicians And Surgeons)