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November 2017 Trends in Racial and Ethnic Minority Applicants and Matriculants to U.S. Medical Schools, 1980-2016

November 28, 2017


September 2017 Why Faculty Choose to Work in Academic Medicine

September 19, 2017


August 2017 An Updated Look at Attendance Cost and Medical Student Debt at U.S. Medical Schools

August 21, 2017

In this Analysis in Brief, we examine how the COA at medical schools has changed from 2009 to 2016; how medical education debt levels for graduating students have changed in that same time period; and how medical school COA trends compare to undergraduate higher education COA trends.


December 2016 Faculty Diversity in U.S. Medical Schools: Progress and Gaps Coexist

December 12, 2016


June 2016 Hospitalists: A Growing Part of the Primary Care Workforce

June 27, 2016

In this Analysis in Brief, Medicare physician claims data were linked to the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile to update published estimates of the number of hospitalists trained in adult primary care specialties and the fraction of the potential PCP workforce they represent. 


May 2016 An Overview of Women Full-time Medical School Faculty of Color

May 24, 2016


March 2016 The Consumer Perspective on Access to Health Care: Pre- and Post- Affordable Care Act

March 21, 2016


Do Free Clinic Experiences Enhance Medical Student Commitment to Underserved Areas?

February 16, 2016

This February 2016 edition of Analysis in Brief (AIB) examines the factors associated with medical students’ commitments to practice in underserved areas.


January 2016 Hospital Characteristics and Performance on Medicare’s Pay-for-Performance Programs Among Major Teaching Hospitals

January 19, 2016


Medical School Professional Staff: Findings from Three Pilot Studies

December 11, 2015


October 2015 Analysis in Brief Supplemental Information

October 20, 2015


October 2015 Primary Care Physicians Who Graduated from U.S. Medical Schools: Trends in Specialty, Gender, and Race and Ethnicity

October 20, 2015


September 2015 Evaluating Payment Accuracy of Medicare Inpatient Short Stays

September 18, 2015


July 2015 Analysis in Brief: Supplemental Information

July 20, 2015


July2015 How Long Does it Take to Proceed from a MD Degree to a Medical School Faculty Appointment?

July 20, 2015


June 2015 The Redistribution of Tenure Tracks for U.S. Medical School Faculty: Basic Science PhD Faculty (Part II)

June 13, 2015


May 2015 The Redistribution of Tenure Tracks for U.S. Medical School Faculty: Clinical MD Faculty (Part I)

May 16, 2015


April 2015 Implementing the Regulations on Financial Conflicts of Interest: Results from the AAMC Conflict of Interest Metrics Project

April 8, 2015


March 2015 Analysis in Brief: Supplemental Information

March 19, 2015


February 2015 Analysis in Brief: Supplemental Information

February 18, 2015


February 2015 The Underrepresentation of Women in Leadership Positions at U.S. Medical Schools

February 18, 2015

Academic medicine has made substantial progress toward gender parity among faculty in medical schools and teaching hospitals over the past several decades. Yet women remain underrepresented in leadership positions in academic medicine, particularly at the highest rungs. Disparity in leadership representation, which is incompletely understood, is a national issue because it has implications for talent entering the healthcare workforce and our ability to strengthen the broader health system. This Analysis in Brief presents a snapshot of the percentage of women in leadership positions in U.S. medical schools. Gender differences in faculty rank progression and promotion rates are also examined, as this progression represents a typical career path to leadership positions. Results show, for example, that the percentage of women in positions of leadership has increased over the past 10 years. The proportion of women in the lowest ranking leadership positions is relatively high, though, while the proportion of women in the highest ranking leadership positions is relatively low (Table 1). Results also show that promotion rates differ between men and women. The results of this AIB can help institutions understand where women are getting caught in the academic medicine leadership pipeline as they strive to increase and intensify interventional strategies to achieve gender parity in academic medicine in the 21st century.


January 2015: Expanding the LCME Severe Action Decisions Analysis to Gauge the Effect of the 2002 Accreditation Standards Reformatting

January 15, 2015

Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) standards guide medical education programs (MEPs) in preparing for accreditation survey visits and shape accreditation decisions. In 2002, these standards were reformatted from prose to numbered format to explicitly link standards to the self-study questions to which MEPs respond. The change clarified the information needed to demonstrate compliance. Prior research defined an LCME severe action decision (SAD) as one that grants a MEP a shortened accreditation term, places it on warning or probation status, or withdraws its accreditation. This Analysis in Brief builds on prior research by expanding the time periods of analysis to see if the finding of increased SADs following the 2002 standards reformatting continues. Results show that SADs comprised 15 percent of LCME decisions made in the first time period, and 31 percent of decisions made in the second (see Table). These results suggest that the LCME standards reformatting has improved the LCME’s ability to monitor MEPs and facilitate a program’s quality improvement and accreditation preparation efforts. The increase in SADs may be because MEPs were unaware of this improvement because their compliance with standards is assessed every eight years. As a result, in 2014, the LCME created a new standard requiring ongoing monitoring of compliance with its standards.


December 2014: Community Health Needs Assessments: Engaging Community Partners to Improve Health

December 11, 2014

The Affordable Care Act requires that 501(c)(3) hospitals conduct a Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA) in conjunction with the communities they serve. For hospitals, health systems, and public health agencies to develop, implement, and evaluate tailored community health improvement strategies, an understanding of locally available resources and community residents’ specific health and health care needs is essential. To facilitate this understanding, this Analysis in Brief explores aspects of AAMC-member hospitals’ conduct of their CHNAs. Survey results indicate that at 83 percent of responding institutions, a senior leader such as a CEO, CMO, VP, or comparable position, played a significant role in CHNA development and implementation. Results also show that AAMC-member hospitals engaged community members in various ways to understand better local needs and assets.  Seventy percent or more of the CHNAs reviewed prioritized access to medical care, mental health, and obesity as important community health needs (Table 1). Given the impact of the social determinants of health on the well-being of a community and the magnitude and seeming intransigence of health and health care inequities in the United States, engaging with communities to identify and intervene on salient health needs is crucial for academic medical centers and their partners to continue to move toward health and health care equity


October 2014: Interprofessional Educational Opportunities and Medical Students’ Understanding of the Collaborative Care of Patients

October 22, 2014

Interest in promoting interprofessional education (IPE) in U.S. medical and other health professions schools is not new, but has received a renewed attention over the past several years. Further, the focus on improving the health care system by providing higher-quality, low-cost care has intensified the need for providing care through interdisciplinary teams. This Analysis in Brief examines medical students’ reports of curricula-based IPE opportunities in their training. Results show that over two-thirds of respondents reported having had curricular-based opportunities to learn with students from different health professions. The findings of this study also suggest that medical students who learn alongside students from a greater number of other health professions also report having 1) a better understanding of collaborative, interprofessional care of patients, and 2) significantly higher levels of overall satisfaction with their medical training. These observed relationships do not imply causality; rather, they indicate that a greater diversity of IPE opportunities is associated with other educational and curricular experiences that enhance students understanding of interprofessional care and increase overall satisfaction with medical training.


August 2014 Analysis in Brief: Analyzing Physician Workforce Racial and Ethnic Composition Associations (Part 2)

August 26, 2014


August 2014 Analysis in Brief: Analyzing Physician Workforce Racial and Ethnic Composition Associations (Part 1)

August 26, 2014


July 2014 Analysis in Brief: The AAMC Fee Assistance Program and Access to U.S. Medical School

July 10, 2014

The AAMC Fee Assistance Program (FAP) is designed to improve access to applying to medical school for those with limited financial means, given that the application entails expenses that occur during various steps of the process. Since the mid-2000s, the number of FAP applications and awards has grown in a rapid and sustained fashion. The extent to which FAP is supporting aspirants and applicants of limited financial means is important in light of studies suggesting a decrease in the percent of lower socio-economic status applicants and matriculants over past decades. This Analysis in Brief (AIB) examines the extent to which the increase in FAP awards is observed among: 1) those who take the MCAT, 2) those who apply to medical school, and 3) those who are ultimately accepted to medical school. Results show sharp increases in the percentages of FAP awardees among those who took the MCAT exam, applied through AMCAS, and were ultimately accepted to medical school (see Figure 1). These findings suggest that those with limited financial means who enter the applicant pool each year have become more likely to apply for and receive fee assistance, thus improving access to applying to medical school among well-qualified applicants of lower income backgrounds.


June 2014 Analysis in Brief: Supplemental Information

May 28, 2014


U.S. Medical School Faculty Perceptions of Department Governance

May 28, 2014

Medical school faculty are a critical resource in our nation’s medical schools. Understanding factors comprising faculty job satisfaction is essential given the high costs of faculty turnover and the nation’s need to ensure a high-quality workforce in light of impending physician shortages. In this Analysis in Brief, data on how specific components of department governance differ by department type (i.e., clinical versus basic science faculty) and faculty perceptions of specific aspects of department governance in nine basic science and 24 clinical disciplines are presented. 

Results show, for example, that perceptions of governance significantly differ by clinical versus basic science departments. Analyses of variation by specific department show that among clinical departments, faculty respondents in physical medicine and rehabilitation and otolaryngology were the most positive about department governance. As satisfaction with department governance is a driver of overall satisfaction with one’s department, understanding departmental differences may suggest specific tools and strategies that department chairs could use to improve the workplace for their faculty members, and, in turn, influence positive change within the medical school.


Graduation Rates and Attrition Factors for U.S. Medical School Students

May 9, 2014

Previous reported graduation rates for U.S. medical students reflect the graduation rates of all students, including those who obtained more than one degree during their time in medical school. This Analysis in Brief presents current data on graduation rates for U.S. medical students, taking into account specific types of degree program (i.e., single- and multiple-degree programs).

In addition, it contains an analysis of the growth in the number and rate of student participation in non-joint degree research and taking a leave of absence from medical schools, as well as an examination of the growth in participation in multiple degree programs. Results show, for example, that the four-year graduation rates for M.D.-only students fell from 90 percent in late 1970 to around 83 percent in the 1980s, where it has remained. 

Results also show that the number of U.S. medical school students enrolled in programs leading to multiple degrees (i.e., M.D. combined with another graduate degree) reflects steady growth in the number M.D.-Ph.D. students over the past two decades: from 1993 to 2013, the number of entering medical students increased by 17 percent, while the number of students enrolled in M.D.-Ph.D. programs increased by more than 100 percent.

These results can be used to understand better the factors that affect time to graduation, which can facilitate schools’ evaluation of student’s progress and advise students during their academic careers.


April 2014 Analysis in Brief: Supplemental Information

April 17, 2014


Personal Well-being Among Medical Students: Findings from an AAMC Pilot Survey

April 17, 2014

Research demonstrates a high prevalence of psychological distress among U.S. medical students, and the effects of distress may be more deleterious to the well-being of students from traditionally underrepresented groups. The negative consequences of distress during medical trainingsuch as reduced empathy, lower ethical conduct, and substance abuseare problematic if they undermine the goal of graduating knowledgeable, effective, and professional physicians.

In this Analysis in Brief, findings on medical student well-being and examines whether or not specific populations of students are disproportionately vulnerable to distress are reported. Results show that there are significant group differences across five measures of well-being. For example, a higher level of stress was reported among first generation college status, female, LGB, Asian (compared to white), and URiM (compared to white) respondents.

Over the past decade, schools have become more aware of the high stress level among their students and many schools have or are implementing wellness initiatives. It will be important, going forward, to examine whether these interventions reduce the perceived stress of medical students and, specifically, if they are helpful for the student subgroups identified in this work, as they are the ones negatively affected by the medical school experience.


March 2014 Analysis in Brief: Supplemental Information

March 12, 2014


An Analysis of the Medical School Pipeline: A High School Aspirant to Applicant and Enrollment View

March 12, 2014

Analysis in Brief, March 2014


February 2014 Analysis in Brief: Supplemental Information

February 7, 2014


U.S. Medical School Full-time Faculty Attrition

February 7, 2014

This study may provide insight into various policy issues. Decreased retention for full professors, along with the increasing number of faculty members in medical schools, raise questions of how best to recruit and support junior faculty, as well as mid-career mentoring plans to advance associate professors.


Personnel Policies to Support Part-time Faculty Members in U.S. Medical Schools: A Status Report

January 2, 2014

Academic medicine has used part-time work schedules as a mechanism to recruit and retain high-quality faculty members, and part-time faculty members represent an important component of the faculty workforce at LCME-accredited U.S. medical schools. This Analysis in Brief reports on the state of faculty policies currently in place for part-time faculty work in U.S. medical schools.

Survey results show that definitions of part-time status differed markedly by institution. Results also show that while over  three-quarters of U.S medical schools had defined faculty career tracks in place for their part-time basic science and clinical faculty members, slightly more than one-quarter of all the responding institutions had a written policy in place that articulated productivity and performance expectations for these faculty. These findings suggest that opportunities for the clarification of productivity and performance expectations for these faculty members by individual schools exist, which could benefit the part-time faculty member who may be seeking guidance and could benefit the institution by establishing a standard approach and procedure to guide these appointments.  


November 2013 Analysis in Brief - Supplemental Information

November 20, 2013


Analysis in Brief: The Relationship between Racial and Ethnic Diversity in a Class and Students' Perceptions of Having Learned From Others

November 20, 2013

November 2013 Analysis in Brief


October 2013 Analysis in Brief - Supplemental Information

October 23, 2013


Health Care Provider Awareness of the Military Status of Patients: Asking the Question

October 23, 2013

Analysis in Brief, October 2013


June 2013 Analysis in Brief - Supplemental Information

June 26, 2013

Numerous studies have been released over the past decade projecting a future physician shortage and concerns about this shortage have increased in recent years. In response, medical schools have increased enrollment and new medical schools have been developed. This Analysis in Brief examines current and projected U.S. medical student first-year enrollment as one aspect of progress towards increasing the physician workforce. It also examines institutional policies and practices designed to encourage student interest in careers in primary care, since half of the physician shortages are projected to be in primary care specialties. Results show that medical school first-year enrollment increased by 18 percent since 2002 as of the 2012–2013 academic year and is projected to increase by 30 percent over the 2002 level by 2017–2018. Results also show that 76 percent of schools responding to the survey said they had or were planning at least one initiative to increase student interest in primary care specialties. National medical school enrollment trends serve as an early indicator of future physician workforce supply, and continuing to track enrollment growth, as well as related growth in graduate medical education, in future years is critical.


June 2013 Analysis in Brief - U.S. Medical Schools' Ongoing Efforts to Meet Physician Workforce Needs

June 26, 2013

Numerous studies have been released over the past decade projecting a future physician shortage and concerns about this shortage have increased in recent years. In response, medical schools have increased enrollment and new medical schools have been developed. This Analysis in Brief examines current and projected U.S. medical student first-year enrollment as one aspect of progress towards increasing the physician workforce. It also examines institutional policies and practices designed to encourage student interest in careers in primary care, since half of the physician shortages are projected to be in primary care specialties. Results show that medical school first-year enrollment increased by 18 percent since 2002 as of the 2012–2013 academic year and is projected to increase by 30 percent over the 2002 level by 2017–2018. Results also show that 76 percent of schools responding to the survey said they had or were planning at least one initiative to increase student interest in primary care specialties. National medical school enrollment trends serve as an early indicator of future physician workforce supply, and continuing to track enrollment growth, as well as related growth in graduate medical education, in future years is critical.


"Letters of Evaluation: Current Practices in the Admissions Process" (Revised - Analysis in Brief, May 2013)

June 6, 2013

This Analysis in Brief presents descriptive results of a survey administered to collect information on current medical school admissions practices regarding the use of letters.

Results show that all medical schools included in the survey used letters of evaluation in their screening processes to learn about applicants’ personal competencies, that more than half of admissions officers indicated being less than satisfied with the quality of information provided by letters, and three out of four schools indicated that a centralized set of guidelines could improve the usefulness of letters.


"Letters of Evaluation: Current Practices in the Admission Process" (Analysis in Brief, May 2013)

May 28, 2013

This Analysis in Brief presents descriptive results of a survey administered to collect information on current medical school admissions practices regarding the use of letters.

Results show that all medical schools included in the survey used letters of evaluation in their screening processes to learn about applicants’ personal competencies, that more than half of admissions officers indicated being less than satisfied with the quality of information provided by letters, and three out of four schools indicated that a centralized set of guidelines could improve the usefulness of letters.


April 2013 Analysis in Brief - Supplemental Information

April 15, 2013


April 2013 Analysis in Brief: "Medicare Patient Hospital Transfers in the Era of Health Care Reform"

April 15, 2013

This Analysis in Brief addresses the differences in the rates of Medicare inpatient hospital transfers among teaching and non-teaching institutions. Results suggest that the majority of transfers—almost three-quarters—were received by teaching hospitals, including a disproportionate number received by COTH hospitals (COTH hospitals comprised seven percent of all hospitals in this analysis; they cared for almost 38 percent of total transfers). Patients admitted as transfers and patients admitted usually to COTH hospitals were more complex and utilized more services than patience at other hospitals. The case mix index (CMI) for the transfer cases received by the typical COTH hospital was 2.5—greater than other teaching and non-teaching hospitals with a CMI of 2.0 and 1.7, respectively. Policy implications in the context of the current health care environment are discussed.


An Assessment of Bridge Funding in U.S. Medical Schools

February 22, 2013

This Analysis in Brief explores how academic institutions support investigators who experience an interruption in sponsored research funding. Specifically, many institutions provide a mechanism—bridge funding—to support high quality research projects during lapses in Federal support.  Results suggest that medical schools consider bridge support an important strategy to help sustain research programs, and in 80 percent of participating institutions, bridge award amounts were limited to $100,000 or less.  Given the extraordinarily difficult fiscal environment for medical research, bridge funding programs may be critical for the survival of promising research projects.


Training for the Treatment of PTSD and TBI in U.S. Medical Schools

November 2, 2012

Medical schools have long recognized the sacrifice of service members and their families. As a part of a national effort to provide high-quality care to returning veterans, many medical schools have pledged to enrich their medical education programs to ensure that current and future physicians are trained in the unique clinical challenges and effective practices associated with caring for military service members, veterans, and their families. The authors of this Analysis in Brief present survey findings that assess the current state of the clinical and educational programs related to military cultural competence and the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury in U.S. medical schools. Results suggest a need to enhance medical education with respect to understanding military service as an aspect of providing culturally competent care.


October 2012 AIB - Training for the Treatment of PTSD and TBI in U.S. Medical Schools

October 30, 2012


The Relationship among Undergraduate Educational Pathways, MCAT Exam Scores, and Acceptance Rates for U.S. Medical School Applicants

September 11, 2012


Estimating the Number and Characteristics of Hospitalist Physicians in the United States and Their Possible Workforce Implications

August 6, 2012


Estimating the Number and Characteristics of Hospitalist Physicians in the United States and Their Possible Workforce Implications- Supplemental Information

August 3, 2012

August 2012 Supplemental Information


Trends in Cost and Debt at U.S. Medical Schools Using a New Measure of Medical School Cost of Attendance (June 2012)

June 29, 2012

Analysis in Brief, June 2012


The Changing Gender Composition of U.S. Medical School Applicants and Matriculants (March 2012)

March 19, 2012

Analysis in Brief, March 2012


An Exploration of the Satisfaction and Experiences of Part-time U.S. Medical School Faculty (Supplemental Information)

December 16, 2011

Analysis in Brief Supplemental Information, December 2011


An Exploration of the Satisfaction and Experiences of Part-time U.S. Medical School Faculty (December 2011)

December 16, 2011

Analysis in Brief, December 2011


The Demographics of Full-time U.S. Medical School Faculty 1966 - 2009 — Supplemental Material

November 14, 2011

Analysis in Brief, November 2011 — Supplemental Materials


The Changing Demographics of Full-time U.S. Medical School Faculty, 1966-2009

November 14, 2011

Analysis in Brief, November 2011


The Evolving Medical School Admissions Interview (September 2011) - Supplemental Information

September 30, 2011

Analysis in Brief, September 2011


The Evolving Medical School Admissions Interview (September 2011)

September 30, 2011

Analysis in Brief, September 2011


Medical School Admissions: More than Grades and Test Scores (September 2011) - Supplemental Information

September 30, 2011


Medical School Admissions: More than Grades and Test Scores (September 2011)

September 30, 2011

Success in medical school requires academic competence, integrity, altruism, self-management, interpersonal and teamwork skills, among other characteristics.  This study describes how admissions committees use applicant data to select students.


Perceptions of the Promotion Process: An Analysis of U.S. Medical School Faculty (August 2011) - Supplemental Information

August 4, 2011


Perceptions of the Promotion Process: An Analysis of the U.S. Medical School Faculty (August 2011)

August 4, 2011

This Analysis in Brief explores faculty perceptions of the promotion process as a key area of faculty satisfaction worth increased attention, given that perceptions of equity in the promotion process are one of the lowest areas of satisfaction among academic medicine faculty members. Results indicate that many faculty found promotion expectations unclear and unreasonable, and importantly, perceptions differed significantly among groups of faculty.


Supplemental Information for Developing, Funding, and Providing Information Technology at U.S. Medical Schools

June 30, 2011


Developing, Funding, and Providing Information Technology at U.S. Medical Schools

June 30, 2011


Supplemental Information for Use and Evaluation of Medical School Information Sources by Aspiring Medical Students

April 14, 2011


Use and Evaluation of Medical School Information Sources by Aspiring Medical Students (April 2011)

April 14, 2011

Medical schools are challenged to attract applicants who will best fit their stated missions, but there are few ways for medical schools to know if they are using the right methods to reach the applicants they seek. Using survey data from medical school aspirants, analyses show that, in terms of usage, the medical school information source cited most was “Medical school Web sites” (59%) and, in terms of value, the Medical School Admissions Requirements (MSAR®) was rated highest for helping aspirants make application decisions.


Supplemental Information for Retention of Full-time Clinical M.D. Faculty at U.S. Medical Schools

February 25, 2011


Retention of Full-time Clinical M.D. Faculty at U.S. Medical Schools (February 2011)

February 25, 2011

Physician and faculty retention have garnered increased attention recently because of the significant costs associated with losing faculty members. This Analysis in Brief examines retention rates of clinical M.D. faculty (i.e., faculty members who typically engage in patient care) by department, and analyzes correlates of faculty intentions to leave their institutions. The data indicate retention rates vary across departments, and the authors provide comparisons between the lowest three and the highest three with select items on a job satisfaction survey.


Supplemental Information for Sponsored Programs Salary Support to Medical School Faculty

January 26, 2011


Sponsored Program Salary Support to Medical School Faculty in 2009 (January 2011)

January 19, 2011

Recently, leaders in the scientific community have suggested that the current system of federal funding may incentivize institutions to encourage faculty to obtain up to 100 percent of their salary from federal grants and that the federal government should consider requiring institutions to pay a greater share of salaries for faculty involved in extramural sponsored research. The data in this Analysis in Brief strongly suggest that medical schools have been far less reliant on sponsored research support for full-time faculty than has been asserted. The average salary support for faculty conducting sponsored research was 29 percent for those with MD degrees and 49 percent for non-MDs.


Medical Students' Socioeconomic Background and Their Completion of the First Two Years of Medical School (December 2010)

December 10, 2010

Although the medical school attrition rate is only approximately 3 percent, students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds, even those with higher MCAT scores, are more likely to withdraw or be dismissed in the first two years of medical school. This negatively impacts a medical school’s ability to maintain a diverse medical student body, since only 15 percent of medical students are from lower socioeconomic backgrounds.


Diversity of U.S. Medical School Students by Parental Education

August 26, 2010

This Analysis in Brief examines the diversity of medical school students by parental education between 1992 and 2008. Findings suggest that students have increasingly come from families with higher socioeconomic backgrounds. The authors also report notable differences by racial and ethnic groups.


Trends in Tenure for Clinical M.D. Faculty in U.S. Medical Schools: A 25-Year Review

August 13, 2010

The number of faculty in academic medical centers, and clinical enterprises in particular, has expanded profoundly over the past several decades. During this expansion, the prevalence of tenure systems and the actual numbers and proportions of tenured positions in U.S. medical schools have garnered much attention. Some commentators have remarked that the system of tenure is vanishing from schools and that the opportunity for tenure-track appointments is declining, especially for clinical faculty. This Analysis in Brief presents data on the current status of tenure systems, the changing distribution of clinical M.D. faculty on tenure-eligible tracks, and trends in numbers of these positions over the past quarter-century.


Supplemental Data for Changes in Medical Students' Intentions to Serve the Underserved: Matriculation to Graduation

August 6, 2010


Changes in Medical Students' Intentions To Serve the Underserved: Matriculation to Graduation

August 6, 2010

This Analysis in Brief examines medical students' intentions to practice in underserved areas and how these intentions change between matriculation and graduation.


May 2010: Additional Data for Promotion Rates for First-time Assistant and Associate Professors Appointed from 1967 through 1997

June 7, 2010


The Relationship between Tenure and Guaranteed Salary for U.S. Medical School Faculty (Analysis in Brief, April 2010)

June 7, 2010


May 2010: Promotion Rates for First-time Assistant and Associate Professors Appointed from 1967 to 1997

June 1, 2010


December 2009: Recruiting Practices for Department Chairs and Center Directors in U.S. Medical Schools

December 2, 2009

The recruitment process of leaders at organizations in general, and at academic medical centers in particular, has been widely criticized as being ineffective and inefficient. Yet for important roles in medical schools such as department chairs, center directors, and other major administrative positions, little is known about how the search process works beyond conventional wisdom and anecdote. This Analysis in Brief provides descriptive data on the search and recruitment process for department chairs and major center directors at U.S. medical schools and describes the role of teaching hospital CEOs in the recruitment of clinical department chairs.


Additional data for "The Aging of Full-time U.S. Medical School Faculty: 1967-2007"

October 19, 2009


October 2009: The Aging of Full-time U.S. Medical Faculty: 1967-2007

October 19, 2009


September 2009: Supplement - Projections of Future Medical School Enrollment

September 25, 2009


September 2009: Projections of Future Medical School Enrollment

September 10, 2009


August 2009: Unconscious Bias in Faculty and Leadership Recruitment: A Literature Review

August 18, 2009


AIB Supplement: Unconscious Bias in Faculty and Leadership Recruitment: A Literature Review

August 18, 2009

August 2009


February 2009: Hospital Transfers of Medicare Patients

February 25, 2009


February 2009: Further Explanation of Case Mix Index (CMI)

February 25, 2009


November 2008: Differences in U.S. Medical School Faculty Job Satisfaction by Gender

November 13, 2008


November 2008: References and additional methodology

November 13, 2008


January 2008: Diversity of U.S. Medical Students by Parental Income

October 30, 2008


September 2008: After Affirmative Action: Diversity at California Medical Schools

September 3, 2008


July 2008: U.S. medical school faculty job satisfaction

June 30, 2008


July 2008: Supporting Data - References and additional methodology for 'U.S. Medical School Faculty Job Satisfaction'

June 20, 2008


June 2008: The Long-term Retention and Attrition of U.S. Medical School Faculty

June 6, 2008


April 2008: Projections of Future Medical School Enrollment

April 4, 2008

In 2006, in response to growing concerns of a likely future physician shortage, the AAMC recommended a 30 percent increase in U.S. medical school enrollment by 2015, using the 2002 first-year enrollment of 16,488 students as the baseline.


February 2008: Challenges and Strategies of Medical School Expansion

January 23, 2008

Medical school administrators face many obstacles throughout their expansion effortsincluding a lack of faculty resources, financial resources, and classroom and training space-but careful planning can help overcome these challenges.


December 2007: Recruitment of New Physician Investigators in Clinical Research

December 5, 2007