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Careers in Medicine Assessments

As you consider your specialty options, it is important to consider your interests, values, skills, and personality. Careers in Medicine self-assessments will help you better understand who you are and what you want in your career, and then will allow you to explore specialty options that might be the best fit for you.

Visit each of the four sections below to complete the assessments. You can also find a link to the assessments dashboard on the right side of this page.

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Notepad and computer

Decisions about your future specialty, residency program, and practice environment are based on who you are and what’s important to you. Before you can make sound decisions about your future, you need to clearly understand yourself.

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 Doctor viewing x-rays on a light board

“What do I like to do?” This is a critical question to contemplate when considering your career. In fact, it often kicks off the career exploration process — as it should. Addressing this question objectively and thoroughly can help you identify areas of medicine — and ultimately, specialties — that fit your interests and can lead you to a satisfying and productive career.

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Smiling doctor

You want to help underserved communities or find the next big cure. You want to be a great doctor and have a life too. You want to be paid well. These statements are just a few examples of how values can be reflected in your career as a physician. And while all of these ideals may sound appealing, you’ll likely focus your efforts to achieve those most important to you.

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Female doctor performing a procedure.

Once you have explored your interests and values, you might have some specialty options in mind. But do you have the skills necessary to pursue them? It is important to identify your strengths and weaknesses, find out how your skill set can inform your specialty decision, and look at areas where you can improve.

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Doctor talking to a patient

Who you are and how you relate to others is important in everyday life. Your style of interacting with patients, colleagues, and supervisors is especially crucial when choosing a specialty and identifying the type of work you want to perform within a specialty.

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 Doctor viewing x-rays on a light board

You’ve spent the time to thoughtfully proceed through each self-assessment. You even reviewed your results and read the information and guidance each report provided. But what does it mean? How should you apply this information in your career planning?

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