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You’re more likely to be satisfied in your professional life if your career matches your interests, values, personality, and skills. In medicine, these characteristics can be reflected in your preferred practice setting(s), patient type(s), medical condition(s), colleagues, and tasks and activities.

To find your fit, first explore who you are and what you want for your life, then identify those career options that will support those goals. Use the Careers in Medicine Self-Assessments to better understand yourself and support your specialty choice.

Interview notes
  • Four-step career process pyramid (thumbnail)

    Identify and achieve your career goals through CiM's four-step career planning process.

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  • Chalkboard with different words pointing to career

    Sound vocational theory says you’re more likely to be satisfied in your professional life if your career matches your personal and environmental characteristics such as interests, values, personality, and skills. In medicine, these aspects of yourself can be reflected in your preferred practice setting(s), patient type(s), medical condition(s), colleagues, and tasks and activities.

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  • Doctor checking watch

    I’m only a first year and still in my basic sciences coursework, but I feel pressure to start thinking about specialties. Why do I need to worry now about choosing a specialty?

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  • A pile of money and a graduation cap.

    Many claim few physicians choose primary care because of prohibitive debt levels, but surprisingly little evidence supports this assertion.

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  • Time Off

    Due to personal problems, I might take time off from school after my second year. How will program directors view this time off, and how much will it impact me if I pursue a competitive specialty or residency?

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